Thinking Beyond Boundaries

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemIn an earlier Friday Flash Report post, “What we really do for a living”, I shared my thoughts about what we really do for a living. What we actually do at work is much more than a job title, and much more than a job function. What we really do for a living is what motivates us—it’s what makes us want to give it our all.

After all, merely fulfilling the function of our job isn’t necessarily what helps us get through tough days, and it’s probably not why we’ll stick around for the long haul. Most of us need something more—more than just a paycheck or a job function to feel good about our jobs and more importantly, to feel a sense of purpose in our work. We need to feel meaning!

When we overcome challenges or solve problems, we know it means we’ve made progress; that feels good! And, we all enjoy opportunities to be creative and innovative, because it gives us a sense of ownership and pride—it feels good to know that we played a part in achieving something great.

Each and every job role at UTMB Health is important and helps us achieve our mission. Our patients and families count on us. And, just as I talked about in my recent posts on teamwork, our colleagues count on us to be there when they pass us the ball, because otherwise, we not only fail our team, but we fail our patients.

Questions we often reflect on, and should continue to reflect on every day, include: How can I help make a difference for a patient or their family member today, whether from the front line of patient care or from behind the scenes? How can I help make a colleague’s day brighter or their work go more smoothly, so they, too, can make a difference for our patients and their families?

Today, I want to reflect on a new question: how can we think beyond our boundaries to meet the needs of our patients, their families, our teams and colleagues? In a challenging health care environment, this will be a question we will face daily. It requires our creativity, innovation and a desire to gain new knowledge. We may not always have every resource we desire to meet the needs we wish we could fill. It means we will need to work together collaboratively within our teams and across departments and mission areas to successfully fill those needs. We must share our knowledge and expertise both with our UTMB colleagues and with those outside our organization, who share our commitment to excellence and passion for exceptional patient care.

Brilliant solutions are easy to see in hindsight. But, having the foresight to come up with one is something completely different. Smart, innovative ideas require unconventional thinking. Sometimes it is necessary to find creative solutions. Sometimes we must be the ones to find a better way.

I recently received some exciting news about how one of our employees, Rachel Murray, business manager for Transplant Services, worked together with the Office of Development to secure a $50,000 grant from the JLH Foundation, which was established according to the wishes of John L. Hern to support the financial needs of transplant patients and their families, and to promote the need for organ donation.

In her proposal, Rachel and the Development team described how the transplant process is one that bears considerable challenges for patients as well as their families. For many, the financial strain can be just as exacting as the physical toll of the procedure. With these new funds, UTMB will be able to help support transplant patients in need by assisting them with temporary housing, travel, prescription medication and transportation services while they are at UTMB for their procedure and aftercare.

Meanwhile, I received another note of good news, when I learned that Richard Foy, program manager in the Department of Neurodiagnostics (formerly the EEG/EP Lab), had an article published in the April 2015 issue of The Neurodiagnostic Journal, “PartnerSHIPS: Aligning Your Department with Administration for Smooth Sailing”.

His article describes the great work done in his area over the course of a two-year period that led to improved patient care outcomes. This achievement was made possible because of the remarkable collaboration that took place between neurodiagnostic technologists and hospital administration. The team worked together to identify barriers to success, improve processes, and identify ways to improve cost and utilization management. Additionally, they implemented a cross-training program among team members and identified professional development opportunities for staff so that they could not only meet operational and financial goals, but most importantly, increase the quality of care.

These are great examples of ways that innovative thinking and information sharing can help us identify new resources, improve patient care and create value, all of which result in new and better programs. Individuals may identify those exciting new ideas, but more times than not, it requires teamwork to achieve our goals. Without this sort of approach, we cannot be as successful and we cannot help others be successful.

I recently read something interesting, written by Jim Canterucci, an author who focuses on personal success. He says he strongly believes that “individuals possessing a habit of innovation, coming together, will make an organization more innovative.” Sound familiar? This is how we truly work together to work wonders!

thinking-outside-the-box

Honoring our past, embracing our future…

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemThis week, I was honored to welcome attendees to the 2015 Neuro Nurses’ Day Conference, an opportunity for practicing clinical nurses to share and explore recent advances in Neurology and Neurocritical Care. The daylong event was held in the Ashbel Smith Building, which many of you know affectionately as “Old Red”.

As I approached the front steps of Old Red, I thought about what a perfect setting this was for a conference about innovation and advances in health care, because this is where nearly 125 years ago, 23 students and 13 faculty members began UTMB’s legacy to advance health care education, research and patient care. Just five years later, UTMB’s School of Nursing opened as the first university-affiliated nursing school in the U.S.

UTMB was founded as a center for scientific inquiry, a training ground for the future of medicine, and a catalyst for improving the health of society. Since that time, we have earned a reputation for graduating health care professionals who share a deep commitment to excellence, a desire to blaze new trails, and an unsurpassed willingness to leverage their extraordinary expertise to improve the health and well-being of others. Today, UTMB continues its legacy and builds on its rich history. This made me think of a principle that a former mentor had shared with me: Respect all that is good about the past while looking forward to the future.

As we embark on our journey to increase the value (cost + quality) of patient care, we must ground those advances in the history of UTMB that has served us well over the past 125 years. The work we do for our patients is incredibly diverse and often complex. We care for patients from all backgrounds, ranging from the most critically ill to those who seek routine preventive care to stay healthy.thumb_972D434E3BF7486F824579B8DCD36448

Therefore, the work that we do for our students and trainees is also diverse and complex, and it is why we recognize lifelong learning as one of our core values. Despite the complexity and challenges of an ever-evolving health care landscape, UTMB is continually recognized for its exceptional achievements.

Innovative approaches to education, like online courses, are helping us offer students alternatives to traditional classroom learning. Thinking back, I remember after Hurricane Ike, I was so impressed to learn that almost all of our SOM and SON curricula were placed online so students could continue their studies without having to physically be on campus. Now, we offer educational outreach methods on an ongoing basis, like the UTMB School of Nursing’s RN-BSN program, which allows current registered nurses an opportunity to advance their education by earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree in a 30-hour, two-semester online program; these innovative approaches to education continue to blossom.

This year alone, nearly 1,000 total faculty members are preparing a diverse student body of more than 3,000 individuals across the fields of medicine, nursing, health professions and biomedical research for a bright future; more than 1,300 of those future leaders will graduate this year.

As I think about our future at UTMB, regardless of the department in which we work, we all have many opportunities to work together collaboratively to make a difference —not just within our own department, but across the entire organization. We continue to seek ways to provide the highest quality of care in every patient interaction. We embrace lifelong learning to grow professionally and take advantage of special educational programs, just like the 185 attendees at this week’s Neuro Nurses’ Conference. We explore ways to share our knowledge and expertise both with our UTMB colleagues and with others who share our commitment to and passion for exceptional patient care.

As we embrace our value of lifelong learning and spirit of innovation, let’s strive to:

  • Reach our fullest potential, personally and professionally.
  • Be adaptable and flexible in our approach to our work so that innovation is a natural outcome of the way we work.
  • Remain open to new approaches and practices in our work.
  • Value the ideas of others and respond in positive ways—this does not necessarily mean we must embrace every idea we hear, but it does mean that we support a culture where new ideas and innovation are welcomed and freely explored.
  • Commit to putting our patients and families first, so that we advance patient- and family-centered care.

UTMB has an unparalleled legacy of service because of the caliber of its people, and in true UTMB spirit, we are thinking boldly about how we can expand the impact of our excellence nationally and globally. Each of us at UTMB Health can best honor our rich history of accomplishment and service by staying focused on our future. We commit to excellence in all that we do as we work together to work wonders for our patients.

Teamwork divides the task and multiplies the success

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemOne of my favorite weekends of the year starts tomorrow. Why? Because it is the NCAA Men’s Regional Final Four Basketball Tournament! This year, I am especially excited, because two Big 10 teams are in the quest to become the 2015 NCAA Championship team. I have a college and alumnae allegiance to the University of Illinois, but I am really a Wisconsin Badger fan, because of the eight years we lived in Madison.

When my family moved there, Wisconsin was not known as a basketball powerhouse, but March Madness of 2000 changed that when Coach Dick Bennett took the Wisconsin men’s basketball team to the Final Four. As I watched Wisconsin play Arizona last Saturday night, I thought of all the lessons we can learn about leadership and teamwork exemplified by this Wisconsin team.

I suppose one has to first live in Wisconsin to truly understand that people there don’t really wish to stand out, individually. For the most part, they are understated people who usually go about doing the work that needs to be done—no fanfare, no need for individual praise; they just want to get the job done, and there’s no feeling that any one job is more important than another.

As I watched the tournament game last weekend, I was struck by the fact that the players’ uniforms all have the classic Wisconsin motion W, but there are no names on the uniforms. As a newbie to Wisconsin basketball in 2000, I asked someone about this. Without hesitation, my friend told me that in Wisconsin, the emphasis is on the team, not the individual. No one player is more important than the other.

As I mulled over that response, I decided that the University of Wisconsin Health System would take the lead from the Wisconsin men’s basketball team, and we eliminated titles from our doors and from our employee badges. I always knew where people worked without these identifiers, because we kept the department name on the badge; but without titles on our badges, it was emphasized that no one position in our organization was more important than any other. We all were important parts of a team.

The other thing I noticed about the Wisconsin team is that if one player was not doing well that night, the team rallied and found someone who could get the baskets needed. Although Frank Kaminsky is a great basketball player, the last two games have not been his very best. Fortunately, Sam Dekker stepped up, and along with the other forward and guards, made the difference between winning and losing. When the opponent finds a weakness, the Wisconsin team adjusts and continues to play.

It’s the same in the work we do at UTMB. We all have our strengths and our weaknesses, but we must magnify the strengths of the team to get the work done. Sometimes the usual leader is not up to a particular job at that moment, so others on the team step up to help and get the job done. During the past two weeks as I have recovered from knee surgery, this has certainly been the case with the leadership team that works with me. They have stepped up and kept everything going exceptionally well to allow me the time I needed to mend.

If you watch the games this weekend, take note of another thing: most of the coaches are running up and down the sideline signaling or calling out plays to the players. The Wisconsin head coach, Bo Ryan, rarely does this. Why? Because he and the team have practiced and practiced and practiced to the extent that he trusts his team to continue to move the ball and make the plays that they have practiced time and time again. They are prepared. And so it should be with us.

One great example at UTMB is that while we have not yet needed to care for an Ebola patient, our nurses, physicians and other employees who will be at the front line of care, should this ever occur, have trained and trained and trained so that they are prepared. There are so many more examples of teams preparing throughout the organization. Have you thought about how you contribute to your team to care for our patients? Even if you don’t directly care for a patient, your supportive work, whether it is filling the Omnicell or greeting families and visitors, contributes to the team’s overall effort to take good care of our patients.

As a leader, it is apparent that Bo Ryan completely supports his team. When he came out of the locker room after halftime in a game where Frank Kaminsky did not have a stellar first half, one of the sports announcers asked what Coach Ryan had said to him team, which was losing at the time. Coach Ryan didn’t take the bait. Instead, he simply said, “I told the team to keep doing what they were doing.” The announcer then tried to get him to comment on Kaminsky’s performance, but Coach Ryan rattled off Kaminsky’s first half statistics and said he thought Kaminsky was having a good game. There it is: Coach Ryan always supports his team. He may privately talk to them about what they need to improve, but publicly, he always supports their efforts. Do anything else, and you erode the team.

Finally, when the Wisconsin team gets behind, they don’t panic. They generally don’t make “dumb shots” or “bad passes”. You win the game (you get where you need to go) if you are prepared and don’t panic. So far that has worked for Wisconsin. The team has two more games to go, and my hope is that they emerge as the champion; if they do not, I am still proud to support them, because for me, they exemplify all that is good about leadership and teamwork.

I know we are faced with much change and many challenges in health care today. The future is riddled with one proposed cut after another from our payors. I know you have heard about our challenge to improve our margin by $100 million over the next five years, and that seems like daunting feat to many. But, if we do not panic, and if we create a detailed game plan for addressing this challenge, then we can systematically work the plan, and we will be successful.

Just as I am confident and proud of the Wisconsin team, so I am confident about UTMB’s future because we have the right team of people and, under the leadership of UTMB President Dr. Callender, we have the right leadership to face future challenges and emerge a stronger UTMB.

 

Teamwork and Trust

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemContinuing with last week’s theme of college basketball (and in honor of March Madness), I thought it would be interesting to talk about some of the different aspects of basketball that foster teamwork and trust. It is fascinating to me that a group of individuals can join together as a team, and even though many of the team members may have never played together in the past, they can become good enough over the course of two to four years that they can always count on one another to be at a particular place on the court during a set point in a specific play.

Practice after practice, the team drills the offensive and defensive plays developed by their coach to become consistent, and through this intense practice and repetition, the plays become second nature—the team develops an intense trust of one another and their coach, and decisions about passing and shooting become instinctive.

The one move that amazes me most is the blind pass, which occurs when the player with the ball looks in one direction but passes in another. This is done to confuse the opposing team’s defense. It is not an easy move, and it is definitely risky, but when it happens and works, it is truly remarkable. I remember the first player I ever saw do this with any regularity was Pistol Pete Maravich, but other greats such as Isaiah Thomas, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Steve Nash and Michael Jordan all also used this pass with some regularity. And most of the time, this type of pass successfully caught the other team off guard, resulting in points scored.

I would imagine in order to effectively carry off the blind pass, each member of the team must understand everyone’s roles well, knowing they can count on one another to be where they should be at a specific moment and time, doing their defined job; they also have to believe their teammates are sufficiently capable. This is really the only way any team can optimally perform!

In many respects, we have our own blind passes in health care. For example, think about how important it is for each member of the team in the emergency department to know their own role as well as that of others on their team. They must trust and have confidence in one another. When seconds matter, as they often do in the ER, being able to act deliberately, consistently and predictably can mean the difference between life and death. And, it is the same in the operating room and on the inpatient units when acting decisively is critical to the outcome for the patient.

In the clinics, the pressure of time may not be as intense, but when a patient needs an appointment or calls with an issue they need to discuss with us, it is important for each member on our team to know their role and perform predictably. If not, we ultimately let the patient down, and our lack of responsiveness could mean we have lost the opportunity to intervene during a time when we could help prevent the patient from becoming increasingly ill and/or having to be admitted to the hospital.

Finally, a good blind pass requires great communication on the court—and, so it is with health care. As we work in teams, being able to be open and forthright with each other regarding the care of each patient is essential. It is critical that every member of the team respects one another and encourages each other to speak up when they are concerned about any aspect of the patient’s plan of care. After all, it is only in an environment of mutual respect and explicit trust that people feel comfortable speaking up. A team is not a group of people who merely work together; a team is a group of people who trust each other.

Phil Jackson is an American professional basketball executive, former coach and former player, who currently serves as president of the New York Knicks in the NBA. He says, “Good teams become great ones, when the members trust each other enough to surrender the ‘me’ for the ‘we’”.

So, how will WE work together to work wonders for our patients and their families today?

Success is the natural consequence of consistently applying the basic fundamentals.

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemI admit it! I love college basketball. Not just any college team, however. I am an avid Kansas University basketball fan (the “why” is a story for another time). We are now about three weeks away from the beginning of March Madness, and other than work, it is hard for me to focus on anything other than watching the games in the evening and on weekends.

My love of the sport began in high school. My senior year, our high school team came in third in the state tournament. I remember walking into the Assembly Hall at the University of Illinois and being overwhelmed by the sheer size of the field house. Today, that experience reminds me of the movie, “Hoosiers”, when Gene Hackman’s team gets to the state tournament. As the team walks into the field house for the first time, Hackman’s character is aware that the team feels overwhelmed by the size of the venue. He asks the players to begin measuring the court. Little by little, they become aware that nothing about the size of the court has changed. What has changed is simply the size of the field house where they are playing.

In many respects, playing in a national or state tournament is a lot like working in health care. The magnitude of what we have to do seems greater than ever before, but the fundamentals of what we do, much like the basketball court, has not changed. Our job is to take the very best care of patients and families that we can. In our tournament, we strive to BE THE BEST!

When I lived in Madison, Wisconsin, the basketball players had to run the hills on the outskirts of the city. Day after day, up and down the hills the players ran. It was not exciting; in fact, it was probably very boring, but year after year, the Wisconsin Badger’s conditioning pays off. Through hard training and practice, under the leadership of Bo Ryan, Wisconsin has become a regular contender in the Road to the Final Four. Last year, they made it to the Final Four.

When I was at the University of Kansas, Coach Ted Owens made his players shoot free throw after free throw, and often it was their predictable free throw shooting that made the difference in their wins. Again, this repetition and daily practice wasn’t glamorous, nor as entertaining as racing down the court, crossover dribbling behind one’s back and dunking the ball, but it was the difference that made the win for the Kansas Jayhawks.

In health care, we condition ourselves through practice—doing the same thing, the same way, every time. That consistency is a must in health care. It is when we deviate from the plan, when we decide that we can do something better than the way we were trained, that we end up not doing well. As we practice doing something over and over, we get better at it, and therefore provide safer care to our patients. Whether it is calling time outs, or reviewing and signing patient histories and physicals, whether it’s gelling our hands before and after entering a patient room, or developing our budgets, training and consistency pays off for our patients and provides the underpinning to BE THE BEST.

As you think about your work this week, what do you need to practice or have your team practice to assure our progress toward the goal – TO BE THE BEST?

“I stick with the fundamentals. The basics.”

—Bo Ryan

 

Focusing on our Future

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemWhen Bill Gates first met Warren Buffett, their hostess at dinner, Gates’ mother, asked everyone around the table to identify what they believed was the single most important factor in their success through life. Gates and Buffett gave the same one-word answer: “Focus.”

Focus is not just something you have—it is also something you do. This type of focus is not static; it is an intense, dynamic, ongoing, iterative process. When people are focused on just a few things, they are usually successful; but when they focus on too many things, the quality, value and timeliness of their work often suffers. Meanwhile, after someone achieves success, they often find themselves suddenly presented with many more new opportunities and options. However, this sudden influx of new opportunities can ironically become the very thing that diffuses what brought success in the first place: it becomes difficult to effectively focus!

Just imagine what would have happened to Ray Kroc, the salesman who turned McDonald’s into a franchise, if after opening twenty McDonald’s locations, he decided to get into the pizza business?

By now, you should all be familiar with UTMB’s new document, The Road Ahead, our institution-wide roadmap for the future and the plan that forms the basis for more detailed goals in each mission area: the Health System, Academic Enterprise and Institutional Support. UTMB President Dr. David Callender recently reviewed the booklet at our most recent Town Hall meeting, and as I’ve attended different meetings and conferences at UTMB, I’ve shared the document with our Health System and Correctional Managed Care teams, as well. If you haven’t seen the document yet, please visit http://www.utmb.edu/strategic_vision.

Why did we feel it was important to revise The Road Ahead? One of the greatest reasons for this change was leadership’s realization that we were trying to do too many things. By distilling our priorities down to the very essence of what we want to achieve, it will not only help everyone remember what we are focused on at UTMB, but it will also help our employees and faculty connect to what is essential to our success as we move forward. Therefore, in the new document we streamlined our strategic priorities, the foundation for our strategic vision to “be the best”, from a total of eight priorities down to four key priorities:  People, Value, Strategic Growth & Management, and Resources.

A while back, I read an article in Havard Business Review, written by Greg McKeown, about how in today’s society, we have a tendency to always take on more, more, and more. In doing so, the state of being overwhelmingly busy is sometimes perceived as possessing some sort of superhuman quality. But in reality, this sort of frenetic pace and perception of success can actually end up negatively impacting the quality of our overall performance—all of our endeavors, especially the most important ones, do not get the attention they deserve for successful outcomes. And we also diminish our own effectiveness as we jump from one thing to another.

McKeown compares the process of identifying our essential tasks and remaining focused on them with the great feeling we get when we box up the old clothes we don’t wear anymore and give them away. The closet clutter is gone. We feel freer. So, wouldn’t it feel liberating and energizing to clean out the closets of our overstuffed to-do lists and give away or eliminate the nonessential items, so we can focus our attention on the things that truly matter?

The pace of growth at UTMB is greater than ever. It’s a very exciting time, but at times it can also feel a little overwhelming—I’m sure every one of you can attest to this. On March 9, at my upcoming Mondays in March presentation, I’ll discuss how the Health System has progressed since FY2013, when it established its vision for the future. I’ll also talk about some of the specific things we’ll be focusing on in the coming year as they pertain to each of our strategic priorities. Then, we’ll talk a little about how each department, work unit and individual at UTMB can help support our goals.

As each of us begins to reflect upon how our work supports the Health System and UTMB’s Road Ahead, I want to encourage you all to remember something important: we can’t do everything, have it all or achieve it all without the ability to also know how to take care of ourselves, stay focused on what’s essential, and know when to say “no” to the opportunities that don’t support our goals as effectively.

This doesn’t mean we want to achieve less; it means we want to do the most important things better. So as we set our goals within our departments and on an individual level, let’s remember to keep our eyes focused on The Road Ahead. We must determine what is essential to our success and pause to carefully consider when something new comes along, whether it adds value to our work or if it can wait until a more suitable time in the future.

Directors and managers should help their employees connect with the goals by identifying and communicating specific actions and behaviors that either support or detract from our success. When each employee associates the work they do with the success of their work unit, they can also see how each person on their team adds value to the Health System and UTMB as an organization.

There are a few simple methods we can use to help ensure we are focusing on the essentials:

  1. Take time on a consistent, regular basis to think about what is essential and what is non-essential on your to-do list. McKeown recommends the “rule of three”: Every three months, take three hours to identify the three things you want to accomplish over the next three. We need time to think and process what we’re working on in order to see the bigger picture.
  2. Rest well to excel. There is a significant difference between good performers and excellent performers—this is not only the number of hours spent practicing, but research also shows that the second most highly correlated factor distinguishing the good from the great is how much they sleep. Self-care is important!
  3. When you hold a new event or complete a new project, keep in mind that although some activities should be continued, not every new activity has to become a tradition.
  4. It’s okay to say “no”—just because we are invited to do something, doesn’t necessarily mean that’s a good enough reason to do it. Although it may seem counterintuitive to say “no” to good opportunities, if we say “yes” to everything, then we won’t have the space to figure out how we really should be investing our time.

Should we really continue taking on more, more, more, or should we try to get more out of what really matters?

This year, we would like Health System employees to focus on the following:

  • For inpatient settings or ancillary department goals for all employees will center on:
    • patient satisfaction
    • a quality goal or a financial goal
    • employee satisfaction and retention
  • For ambulatory clinic settings, goals for all employees will center on:
    • patient satisfaction
    • overall patient access
    • employee satisfaction and retention

Any organization can have a vision and a strategic plan, and every department, unit and clinic can set individualized goals for the year, but that doesn’t guarantee anyone’s success. By focusing on the few things that are really essential, we’re able to make a more valuable contribution.

UTMB can best honor its long history of accomplishment and service by staying focused on its future. Thank you for everything you do to support UTMB’s vision of Working Together to Work Wonders.

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” – Marcel Proust

Be your own Valentine!

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemThis weekend, it’s Valentine’s Day, and that means the aisle at the grocery store that was once fully stocked with chocolates, candy, roses and stuffed animals will soon be empty—at least until the next holiday’s shipment arrives!

Whether you’re treating yourself to a heart-shaped box of chocolates or getting something special for a loved one, don’t forget that February is also American Heart Month. So this Valentine’s Day, here’s to taking care of our loved ones and ourselves! After all, there is no better way to honor your commitment to someone (and yourself!) than doing something that adds to a long, happy, and healthy life.

The following are some easy ways you can promote Heart Health for yourself and others:

  1. Celebrate American Heart Month. At least 200,000 deaths from heart disease and stroke each year are preventable. Help raise awareness about heart disease prevention and learn how to lower heart disease risk!
  2. Give the gift of quality time. Quality time is one of the most meaningful gifts you can give to yourself and to others. Start a creative project or read a book. The weather forecast for this weekend is sunny and warm! It will be a great opportunity for outdoor activities, like riding a bike or taking a walk (walking for as little as 30 minutes a day provides heart-health benefits). Whatever you choose to do, have a great time doing it, and you just might burn a few extra calories!
  3. Don’t let Valentine’s Day plans stress you out. Learn ways to cope with stress and engage in healthy activities, including getting plenty of sleep. Call a friend or spend some time with your pet. Breathe deeply—breathing exercises are a great way to begin and end your day. In fact, abdominal breathing for 20 to 30 minutes each day helps increase the supply of oxygen to your brain, slows your heart rate, helps your muscles relax, and quiets your mind.
  4. Set a “table for two” at home. Most restaurants will be crowded, expensive, and unhealthy. Cooking at home is an excellent way to control the quality and amounts of what you eat. Take a local cooking class to practice your skills or learn a new technique. Treat yourself and loved ones to healthy meals that include fruits and vegetables and foods low in saturated fat and salt.
  5. If you smoke, quit smoking. One of the best things you can do for your heart is to give up smoking or help a loved one quit. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, accounting for 1 of every 5 deaths.
  6. Just move. Plan an activity that encourages physical fitness. Regular physical activity can help control your weight, reduce your risk of heart disease and some cancers, improve mental health and mood, and increase your chance of living longer. Adults need 2 hours and 30 minutes of activity each week.
  7. Prevent the spread of germs by washing your hands often, getting a flu vaccine, and avoiding close contact with someone that is sick.
  8. Learn the most common symptoms of a heart attack. Call 9-1-1 immediately if these symptoms occur.

This weekend, let’s all give ourselves the Valentine gift of a healthy heart. Buy yourself a Valentine present or make yourself a card to display in your office or on the refrigerator that reminds you to be good to yourself!

healthheart

For more heart health tips, download Heart Health Valentine’s Day Tips from the American Heart Association (AHA) here or visit the AHA website.

An Act of Kindness Allows a Man to See Daughter Graduate

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemI hope you all are familiar with the Health System’s Friday Focus Newsletter. The Health System publishes the newsletter for our employees each month to share exciting accomplishments and important news within and across the Health System. UTMB employees are always invited to suggest topics for the newsletter or to submit their own stories.

Last month, Dennis Santa Ana, patient care facilitator of Unit J9A CT Surgery/Vascular Surgery, also known as UTMB’s Dedicated Cardiac Care Unit, sent in a story about how his team came together to help a patient enjoy a special moment with his daughter. Upon reading the story, I thought it was so touching that I decided to save it for this Friday’s message!

The Dedicated Cardiac Care Unit is unique in that it is much more than a regular hospital patient unit. It is equipped with specialized monitoring devices like those found in an ICU, such as electrocardiogram (EKG) and atrial electrocardiogram (AEG). It is designed for patients who require specialized cardiac care, such as individuals who have recently undergone a heart transplant or have had a Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) implanted.

The comprehensive care the unit team fosters close relationships with patients. Dennis Santa Ana says, “Patients feel like we’re family and they know they can call any of us individually any time to get help. We’re here for them. We become more than health care providers; we are counselors and friends. We become their support system.”

That’s what Santa Ana’s story is all about…

An Act of Kindness Allows a Man to See Daughter Graduate
by Dennis Santa Ana

Recently, UTMB’s Dedicated Cardiac Unit (J9A) admitted a patient with advanced congestive heart failure, a condition in which the heart cannot pump enough oxygenated blood to meet the needs of the body’s other organs.

After a right-side heart catheterization, the primary care team determined the patient needed to be started on intravenous cardiac inotropic drugs, which would help improve his heart function by helping his heart beat more strongly. The team hoped this combination of therapies would allow him to be discharged home once he achieved hemodynamic stability (normal blood pressure or adequate cardiac output).

Despite these interventions, the cardiac drips only minimally improved his heart function, and after the results of additional diagnostic tests were received, the primary team concluded that a heart transplant would be his only hope for survival. The patient’s medical condition had deteriorated to the point that it would not be safe for him to wait at home for the heart transplant, and he would need to remain as an inpatient during the waiting period. From this point on, his life had changed—his prognosis was uncertain.

One day while receiving treatment, the patient told his nurses his greatest wish was to see his daughter graduate from college that month, but he feared this may only be wishful thinking, because he understood he was in no condition to leave the hospital for the ceremony.

His nurse shared his wish with the other members of the nursing staff during one of their informal discussions. The team began brainstorming for different ideas to help the patient and decided they could use the internet to Skype or FaceTime during the graduation ceremony. Several of the nurses coordinated with the family regarding the plan, and one of the nurses obtained the university’s website where the graduation would be streamed live.

On the day of the graduation, the nursing staff set up their conference room so they could stream the ceremony onto the large projector screen. One of the nurses even served popcorn for the occasion. The patient was able to watch the entire graduation ceremony, and thoroughly enjoyed it—he was happy and proud to see his daughter receive her college diploma. The patient was very grateful to the nursing staff in J9A for giving him this rare opportunity to witness a once-in-a-lifetime event.

Excellent patient care is treating the whole person, mind, body and spirit. It’s more than providing the best medical care possible for our patients. It is also about providing that care in an atmosphere of kindness and compassion. I’d like to thank Dennis Santa Ana for taking the time to share his team’s story and to give special thanks to the nurses of J9A for exemplifying excellence, compassion, teamwork, advocacy, critical thinking and patient- and family-focus!

“Love and kindness are never wasted. They always make a difference. They bless the one who receives them, and they bless you, the giver.” —Barbara de Angelis

 

Working Together Is Success

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemIn my recent post, “Your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other”, we explored how UTMB’s vision for the future forms the basis for our goals moving forward, both in the present year and in the years to come. We also affirmed that the key to our success is working together to be the best academic health center. This week, I’d like to talk about why working together as a team, cooperating and forging relationships, is so important to our future.

There is a line in a poem by John Donne: “No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Many of the great things worth doing probably can’t be achieved in isolation, and working together often allows an organization to achieve something that an individual working alone cannot. At UTMB, we want to become the preferred, integrated health care provider in the region for our patients, partners and referring physicians. Simply put, we want to be the best. Therefore, our goals and strategies must also be integrated in as many ways as possible. Through teamwork, we can achieve higher quality outcomes that are more efficient, thoughtful and effective. By doing so, each individual and team at UTMB can garner great support and achieve a great sense of accomplishment.

Success in the modern health care environment is complex and continually presents new challenges. At UTMB, we’ve been progressive in our work and our goals must be ambitious in order to remain competitive and truly become the best. We have a lot on our plates as we take major strides to improve patient satisfaction, patient and family engagement, and the quality of care, all the while lowering costs and improving efficiency. Our resources are limited, and this means we must find ways to team up and streamline our work. As a health care provider, or even as a business, we are not alone in this—today companies, on average, set six times as many performance requirements as they did more than 50 years ago.

However, challenges also present great opportunities for success. The key lies in how we will respond to the challenges. As we strive to develop more efficient processes and new models of care, improve access to our system, and enhance communication with our patients and families (all of which are multifaceted initiatives), we must create an environment in which our providers and staff can work with one another to develop creative solutions to complex challenges. We must be innovative and adaptive. Our solutions don’t have to be sophisticated or perfect, but they have to create greater value. The solutions must be developed by and integrated among teams who work together and depend on one another.

When people cooperate, they use fewer resources; conversely, when we don’t cooperate we need more time, equipment, systems, teams and resources. Staff must compensate for a lack of cooperation, and often, even safety risks can result. Teamwork involves removing barriers that make us self-sufficient. Sharing resources is a good way to make people more dependent on, and more cooperative with, one another. Without such buffers, our actions have a greater impact on one another’s effectiveness. By creating overlaps, streamlining activities, partnering with our partners and affiliates increases the mutual value of our work.

But teamwork is more complicated than cooperation alone. While cooperation is usually for the sake of a common goal that the entire team is working toward—some measurable outcome, a willingness to cooperate stems from relationships that develop between coworkers and leaders. What are the connections, the interactions, and the synapses? Teamwork cannot exist without relationships, even if the extent of the relationship is minimal. Teamwork does not occur if each person does their own thing separately from their work relationships.

To respond to complexity intelligently, people have to really understand each other’s work: understand how each person on the team contributes to the overall process of accomplishing a goal, the goals and challenges others have to meet, the resources they can draw on, and the constraints under which they operate. People can’t find this kind of information in formal job descriptions; they can learn it only by observing and interacting. Without this shared understanding, people might blame problems on other people, and not where it actually should be, like broken or inefficient processes, for example.

In many cases, understanding what people do by shadowing them will provide insights into where and how cooperation is breaking down. Identify individuals in your work area who are already interacting with multiple stakeholders (patients as well as internal partners). These people can act as integrators, helping the teams obtain from others the cooperation needed to deliver more value.

Finally, bring the best out of one another. Know and recognize the strengths of others in your teams and encourage one another to leverage those strengths. Everyone is empowered to use their judgment and intelligence, and feedback is important so we can all understanding where we are performing well and where improvement is needed. Stay tuned into how your team is performing. Don’t be afraid to speak up when you see something that feels unsafe, if you feel concerned, uncomfortable, or think the team should stop and reevaluate a situation. Reward those who cooperate, and don’t fail to ask for help when you need it!

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.” —Henry Ford

This entry was based on “Six Simple Rules: How to Manage Complexity without Getting Complicated” by Yves Morieux

Happiness is not the belief that we don’t need to change. It is the belief that we can.

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemWe are now a couple weeks into the New Year, and I am still in the spirit of New Year’s resolutions. I am going to make a guess we all have at least two things in common: we have made a New Year’s resolution at some point; and we have broken a New Year’s resolution at some point. I know in my past, I’ve let my focus drift off those resolutions, but I also have to remind myself that just as long as it takes to break an old habit, it usually takes time to create a new habit, especially when we are pursuing a big goal. It can be easy to get discouraged when we waiver, yet you can’t rush a good thing. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

The path to success is full of obstacles. We will undoubtedly stumble as we pursue our goals. In the process, we learn how to confront future challenges. This all has a lot to do with our perspective, doesn’t it? That’s why I thought I would share the message of recorded lecture I recently came across, called “The Secret to Happy Work”, presented by Shawn Achor, an American educator, author and speaker.

Shawn begins by telling a story about a time when he was seven, playing with his younger sister, Amy, on top of their bunk bed. Shawn, in the role as oldest sibling, naturally assumed this meant she had to do everything that he wanted to do—and he wanted to play war. As they played on top of their bunk beds, he lined up all of his G.I. Joe soldiers and weaponry. On the other side, were all of his sister’s My Little Ponies, ready for a cavalry charge.

Then, somehow during the game, “Without any help or push from her older brother at all,” he claims, “Amy suddenly disappeared off of the top of the bunk bed and landed with a crash on the floor.” As Shawn nervously peered over the side of the bed to see what had befallen his fallen sister, he saw that she had landed painfully on her hands and knees on all fours on the ground.

Now even more acutely aware of his role as the older sibling, Shawn knew he was in trouble. His parents had asked that he make sure they played safely and as quietly as possible. As he looked down at his sister’s face, he saw a wail of pain, suffering and surprise threatening to erupt from her mouth and threatening to wake his sleeping parents. So he did the only thing he could think to do in his frantic state to avert this tragedy: “Amy, Amy, wait. Don’t cry. Don’t cry. Did you see how you landed? No human lands on all fours like that. Amy, I think this means you’re a unicorn.”

Of course, being a unicorn was an option that was open to her brain at no point in the past. He could see how this had taken her aback, as she nearly forgot her pain while contemplating her new-found identity as a unicorn. Instead of crying, instead of ceasing their play, instead of waking their parents and all the negative consequences that would have ensued for Shawn, a smile spread across her face and she scrambled right back up onto the bunk bed with all the grace of a baby unicorn…with one broken leg.

Shawn identified this as the moment he stumbled upon a concept that some 20 years later would be at the forefront of a scientific study: positive psychology. Today, Shawn has devoted his life to research in the field, and in particular how we can be happier by realizing it’s not necessarily reality that shapes us, but the lens through which our brain views that reality. He says, if you change your lens, you can not only change your happiness, but the outcomes.

To that end, he explains that our society’s most commonly held formulas for success are broken. Conventional wisdom holds that if we work hard we will be more successful, and if we are more successful, then we’ll be happy. We think, “If I can just find that great job, or win that next promotion, lose those ten pounds, or (fill in the blank), then happiness will follow.”

But Shawn’s extensive research and other recent discoveries in the field of positive psychology have shown that this formula is backward: Happiness fuels success, not the other way around. When we are positive, our brains become more engaged, creative, motivated, energetic, resilient and productive at work.

He believes the three greatest predictors of happiness are optimism (the belief your behavior will eventually matter), social connection, and how we perceive stress (as a challenge or as a threat).  If we want to raise happiness, we need to make both mindset and behavior shifts.

This discovery has been supported by rigorous research in psychology and neuroscience, management studies, and the bottom lines of organizations around the world. Shawn now spends his time teaching, advising and lecturing at top organizations on how we can reprogram our brains to become more positive in order to gain a competitive edge at work and create more success, happiness and reward in our lives. What are the five key steps that we can take each day to increase our experience of happiness?

  1. Bring gratitude to mind – Write down three NEW things that you are grateful for each day
  2. Journal – About a positive experience you’ve had recently for 2 minutes once a day
  3. Exercise – Engage in a minimum 15 minutes of mindful cardio activity
  4. Meditate – Watch your breath go in and out for 2 minutes a day
  5. Engage in a random, conscious act of kindness – Write a 2-minute positive email or note thanking a friend or colleague

Do these steps for 21 days, and experts believe you can reprogram your mindset toward being more positive. And by doing these activities and by training your brain just like we train our bodies, Shawn believes we can create ripples of positivity. In the end, happiness is not the belief that we don’t need to change.  It is the belief that we can.

“Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense. This day…is too dear with its hopes and invitations to waste a moment on the rotten yesterdays.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson

Watch Shawn Achor’s full presentation at TEDxBloomington:

http://www.ted.com/talks/shawn_achor_the_happy_secret_to_better_work?language=en