Making a Pound of Honey

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemI have always been fascinated by honeybees. I often observed the bees as a child, and although I’d occasionally get too close for their comfort and was stung, I was still very intrigued by how synchronized they were in their work and how each bee seemed to have a certain role.

During a honeybee’s short lifetime, which lasts about two months, it will visit millions of flowers and travel a distance equivalent to twice around the earth, while only producing one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey. Thus, it requires anywhere from 20,000 to 60,000 bees to make a single pound of honey. From the queen bee to each and every worker bee, the entire hive must work together in their roles to achieve their life’s purpose of making honey.

This past week, I thought of the bees and the magnitude of their collaborative effort when I heard about two outstanding recognitions achieved at UTMB—these accomplishments could not have been possible without a tremendous amount of teamwork!

News of the first recognition came last Friday, when David Marshall, our chief nursing and patient care services officer, sent out an announcement that UTMB’s Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) was awarded the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (ACCN) Beacon Award.

The Beacon Award recognizes individual units that distinguish themselves by improving all aspects of patient care. It also signifies that UTMB patients who are admitted to our SICU experience better outcomes and are more satisfied with their overall experience.

For our nurses, this award means that generally, there is a positive and supportive work environment with a greater degree of teamwork and collaboration between all caregivers, higher employee morale and lower turnover rates. What an outstanding accomplishment that exemplifies the phrase “win-win” for both our patients and the staff of the SICU!

In addition, earlier this week, Dr. Barbara Thompson, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, received the news that all three of our Family Medicine practice sites (Island West, Island East and Dickinson) were awarded Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) status, the highest level recognized by National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Only a little more than half of NCQA-recognized practices have achieved the Level 3 status.

This recognition acknowledges an undertaking that began in the fall of 2011 to prepare our clinics to operate under a special model of patient care that is designed to strengthen the relationship between the patient and their care team. Each patient has an ongoing relationship with their care team, which consists of their physician, a medical assistant, nurses, patient care technicians and other clinical and administrative staff, at a single location. The team takes collective responsibility for the patient’s care, providing for his/her health care needs and arranging for appropriate care with other qualified clinicians. The medical home is intended to result in more personalized, coordinated, effective and efficient care. This is the epitome of teamwork, and having this recognition positions UTMB well for the future of health care reform!

Each of us works on a team that in some way, shape or form impacts our patients, and we all have an important role to play in assuring that our patients receive the best possible care. Our individual contributions to the team on which we work are critical to achieving UTMB’s vision of “working together to work wonders as we define the future of health care and strive to be the best in all endeavors.”

Thank you for your individual contributions to the team. Your work truly does make a difference in patients’ lives!

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