When we do our best at everything, the future takes care of itself.

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemLast week, UTMB President Dr. David Callender gave opening remarks at the organization’s Annual Professionalism Summit. The summit is an opportunity for the UTMB community to join together to renew its commitment to an environment that supports and measures professionalism and holds one another accountable to each other and those we serve. In his remarks, Dr. Callender underscored the fact that only through professionalism can we achieve our mission and vision, while emphasizing that our vision (what we strive to become) is not about being the biggest academic health center or being the best-known academic health center—it’s about being the best.

There is something about being the best that is important to keep in mind, however—it is an ongoing pursuit of excellence.

In the late seventeenth century, three rural families dominated the musical instrument industry. Working in shops located side by side in the Italian village of Cremona, these families produced the finest violins. The Amatic family hung a sign outside their shop that read, “The best violins in all of Italy.” Not wanting their creations to go unnoticed, the Guarneri family posted a sign that read, “The best violins in all the world!” The famous Anton Stradivari, known to produce the very finest stringed instruments, boasted his worldwide renown by hanging a sign on his front door that simply read, “The best violins on the block!”

Zig Ziglar, an American author, salesman and motivational speaker, once said, “The greatest enemy of excellence is good.” These three Italian families were proud of and prominently advertised their product. They also understood the aggressive competition among them would never allow “good” to be their best.

Whether we proclaim that our care or services are the best in the country or in the world, remember, there might be someone on the block who surpasses us.

Would our patients and families want us to settle for “good enough”? Would we? Will settling for good enough ever make UTMB the best? Will it make each of us, as individuals, the best at what we do? This is why we must always strive to achieve excellence. It’s important to remember that excellence in any endeavor is not automatic. As Dr. Stephen Covey says, “Real excellence does not come cheaply. A certain price must be paid in terms of practice, patience and persistence—natural ability notwithstanding.” Go a step beyond the customary or ordinary. Give just a little more than normal.

But perhaps the most important part of becoming excellent is to possess the desire and the motivation to become the best. The great author, Charles Dickens said, “Whatever I have tried to do in my life, I have tried with all my heart to do well. What I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely.”

However you define excellence, it is important to keep in mind that it is not a project, act, or job description; excellence is a way of life. It doesn’t mean we are asked to hang the moon. Rather, it’s the little things that make the big things possible. “Only close attention to the fine details of any operation makes the operation first class,” said the great entrepreneur, J. Willard Marriott.

When you feel a compelling, constant daily desire to do everything in your life as well as it can constantly be done, you will touch the borders of excellence. When people perform the common things in life in an uncommon way, the world will sit up and take notice. When we do our best at everything, the future takes care of itself.

I know that many of us are thinking about UTMB’s future – what is our plan? Why are we handling the many projects we have underway? What is my part? We will be discussing all of that in the coming year through many venues. However, as we are about to start the new fiscal year, I wanted to start out with a simple message – if each person at UTMB commits to excellence – to being the best they can possibly be and do the best job they possibly can for our patients, we will achieve our plans and, ultimately, we will be the best!

One thought on “When we do our best at everything, the future takes care of itself.

  1. “Whatever your life’s work is, do it well . . . If it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures, like Shakespeare wrote poetry, like Beethoven composed music. Sweep streets so well that all the hosts of Heaven and Earth will have to pause and say, ‘Here lived a great street sweeper who swept his job well.’” ~ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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