Pack healthier lunches to send with kids

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics sent pediatricians some information about school lunches.

While shopping in any grocery store you will notice many neatly compartmentalized prepackaged foods designed to make packing a child’s lunch fast and easy.

With the threat of childhood obesity, these convenience products might help contribute to obesity.

It is important to make sure your children are getting nutritious lunches instead of refined and processed foods like chips, cookies and roll ups.

Processed foods keep well, but the process of making them stable strips the nutrients away and all that remains are sugars and artificial flavors.

The academy recommends that children consume a good balance of foods from the five major groups — vegetables, fruits, grains, protein and dairy. Continue reading

Prepare child for going back to school with safety tips

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

A new school year is about to begin. As you prepare your child for his or her time in the classroom, remember there is more to getting ready for school than just buying supplies.

If your child will be walking or riding a bicycle to school:

Teach your child to obey all traffic signals and signs and to look left, right and left again for moving vehicles before he or she crosses the street, to cross at an intersection and to never dart into the street from behind objects such as bushes or parked cars.

Make sure your child knows to look out for cars because even though adults in cars should be sure to look out for children while driving through school zones, this does not always happen. Don’t allow your child to wear headphones or play hand-held video games while walking to school. Continue reading

Insect bites, stings cause problems for children

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Summer is here and with it comes warm weather, more daylight and bugs.

Many insects have bites or stings that can cause problems, but what is the difference between a bite and a sting?

Venomous insects inject painful, toxic venom through their stingers. The stings are painful, red and can swell up to 12 inches from the site of the sting.

This is called a local reaction. A person who is allergic to the venom of the insect might have a systemic or whole-body reaction.

Redness, hives and swelling might occur, and this type of reaction can affect airways, as well as circulation and might become life-threatening if not treated in time.

Nonvenomous insects bite in order to feed on your blood. Allergic reactions do occur from nonvenomous insect bites, but severe allergic reactions are rare. Continue reading

TV, media has impact on children, adolescents’ health

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

By the time an average child finishes high school, he or she will have spent thousands of hours in front of the television set.

Today, many pediatricians believe excessive television viewing by youngsters reinforces such destructive behaviors as alcohol abuse and cigarette smoking.

According to a study published in “Pediatrics,” the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, television and other media represent one of the most important and underrecognized influences on child and adolescent health.

“American media contribute more to adverse health outcomes than to positive or prosocial ones,” according to authors from the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Young people average 16 to 17 hours of television viewing weekly, beginning as early as age 2, the article states. When video game and videocassette usage are added, some teenagers may spend as many as 35 to 55 hours in front of the TV.

Citing more than 150 references, the authors note the following: Continue reading

Bacteria, viruses causes of foodborne illnesses

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Food-borne illnesses are caused by germs or harmful chemicals we eat and drink. Most are caused when certain bacteria, viruses or parasites contaminate food.

Others occur when food is contaminated by harmful chemicals or toxins. Since these infections or chemicals enter the body though the stomach and intestines, the most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal discomfort.

Around 100 years ago, typhoid fever, tuberculosis and cholera were some of the most common food-borne illnesses.

Now with improved food processing, pasteurization of milk and water treatment, these diseases have been almost eliminated. Today, other bacteria and viruses have become common causes of food-borne illnesses.

  • Camplyobacter is the most common bacteria causing food-borne diarrhea in the world. These bacteria live in the intestines of birds and often contaminate raw poultry such as chicken.

Eating undercooked chicken or eating food contaminated by juices from raw chicken is a common way to swallow these bacteria.

It causes a diarrhea that is often bloody with fever and cramps. Most people recover without any special treatment. There are rare complications such as arthritis. Continue reading

Book offers advice for dealing with children with ADHD

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Dr. Michael Reiff, editor, explores Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder myths and realities in the book “ADHD: A Complete and Authoritative Guide.” Reiff and his colleagues note that some of the most prevalent misconceptions are these:

  • “He’s just lazy and unmotivated.” A child who finds it almost impossible to stay focused at school or complete long tasks may try to “save face” by acting as if he or she doesn’t care or doesn’t want to do the task. That is masking a serious difficulty in his ability to function.
  • “He’s a handful or she’s a daydreamer but that is normal. They just don’t let kids be kids.” All children are impulsive, active and inattentive at times. But a child with ADHD has a serious problem fitting into family routines, keeping friends, avoiding injuries and following rules. Continue reading

Take steps to not leave children in hot vehicles

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Hot weather is here. Every year, there are new reports of children dying after being left in hot cars.

We have already had our first reported death of a toddler left in a car.

The inside of a car can heat up very quickly — even when the temperature outdoors is mild.

On an especially hot day, the interior of a car can heat up to 122 degrees in less than 20 minutes; within 40 minutes, it can get so hot that a child left inside a car for that length of time can die.

Many parents think that leaving the window of the car open slightly will keep the temperature lower, but fail to realize that it will still remain too hot in the car for the child.

Young children, especially infants, are more sensitive to heat than adults because their bodies do not regulate temperature as well as an adult’s body does. A child left in a hot car can suffer from heat stress, dehydration and shock. Continue reading

Be on look out for swimmer’s ear in children

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Swimming is a great way for kids to stay active, especially during the summer months.

However, the combination of heat, humidity and water can lead to an ear condition called acute otitis external, more commonly known as swimmer’s ear. The infection often is caused by bacteria being carried into the outer ear canal.
Symptoms of swimmer’s ear include redness, swelling, itching, drainage of pus and pain.

Following are some tips from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent and treat swimmer’s ear: Continue reading

How to take the sting out of bee, wasp stings

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Summer is here and yellow jackets compete for our barbecued burgers and soft drinks while bumblebees in the clover can collide with big and little bare feet.

As many parents know, bee stings can put a damper on summer fun. Here are a few things to keep in mind if your little one gets stung.

Most bee stings cause a painful red bump, which often appears immediately.

If you notice a black dot in the bump, the stinger may still be in the skin and needs to be removed.

You can do this by simply scraping across the black spot with a striate edge, such as a plastic credit card or fingernail. Continue reading

Mentally ill may be easy to blame, but they’re rarely violent

Dr. Jeff Temple

Dr. Jeff Temple

Here we are on the heels of several mass shootings. What used to be shocking has become commonplace. In fact, the United States is averaging more than one per month for the last five years.

These events have the public, media, talking heads and politicians searching for explanations and an answer to stop the bloodshed.

Increasingly, mental illness has become the convenient culprit. But let’s not mistake correlation for causation.

Mental illness does not cause violence. If it did, then homicide rates in other developed countries would be on par with that of the United States. They are not.

In 2012, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime found that Americans are 4.5 times more likely to die by homicide than citizens of other developed countries.

And while more than 25 percent of Americans will have a diagnosable mental disorder, nearly all of them will not hurt or threaten to hurt anyone. And nearly all them find the actions of Adam Lanza, Elliot Rodger and Aaron Ybarra reprehensible. Continue reading