Hearing loss in children on the rise

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

The latest song is blasting through the earphones of the teen’s iPod. It’s so loud the other kids can hear it, even though they’re a good 10 feet away. We’ve all heard the noise: Whether it’s coming from a car radio, a concert, or yes, even those personal music players that are so popular, it seems the volume on life is cranked up and the knob ripped off.

Can you hear your mother’s words ring in the back of your mind? “Turn that down, you’re going to go deaf!” Nearly 27 million Americans age 3 and older suffer from some sort of hearing loss. That’s double the number 30 years ago.

In children, three main culprits make up the majority of causes of hearing loss. They are otitis media, hearing loss at birth, and other acquired causes, like complications from the measles, mumps, or a head injury. Continue reading

Tips to help families improve fitness, eating habits

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

In the last two to three decades, the number of overweight children has doubled. Almost one child in five is considered overweight. Obesity can lead to risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, sleep apnea, orthopedic problems, liver disease, asthma, as well as low self-esteem and depression. The likely cause of the increase in the amount of overweight children is more than likely the same reason that adult obesity is on the rise: overeating and lack of physical activity.

Because of these findings new guidelines have been developed by the Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents appointed by the National Health, Lung and Blood Institute and endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The recommendations are regardless of family history all children between the age of 9 and 11 years undergo lipid screening for nonfasting non-HDH-cholesterol levels or a fasting lipid panel. This is to be repeated with another full lipid screen between 18 and 21 years of age. It is unclear in children what the treatment should be when an elevated LDL-cholesterol is found. However there is strong evidence that healthy eating and increased activity is associated with a healthy heart.

The following are a few suggestions to help your family start a program to improve eating habits and increase physical activity. Continue reading

Set healthy goals for children in 2015

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Now that the magic of Christmas is complete, there’s a new year to look forward to. It’s a new beginning. We can all wipe the slate clean and start over once again!

Your children can be part of that optimistic time of year when we swear off the chocolate, vow to drink more water, and sign up for the gym in droves. And, while as adults, we saddle ourselves with major pressure, the goals you and your child can set are much more manageable.

The goals for your child are totally attainable. For example, (this is the part where you grab your child, curl up on the couch with this column, and have them repeat after you):

1. I will clean up my toys
2. I will brush my teeth at least twice a day
3. I will wash my hands after going to the bathroom and before eating
4. I will share with my sisters, brothers, and friends Continue reading

Select toys that are safe, age appropriate for children

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission was created in 1973 to develop safety regulations for all consumer products. The CPSC spends more than half of its budget every year testing children’s toys, as well as other items on the market for children.

When buying presents for your child, select toys that are age-appropriate. No matter how mature you think that your child is, he or she should not play with toys that are meant for an older age group. Age-appropriate levels for toys are determined by safety factors rather than by intellectual and developmental factors. Continue reading

Basic guidelines to internet safety

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

The Internet can be a valuable resource for both adults and children, but there are potential dangers for children when it comes to the Internet. A child may come across material that is sexual, hateful, violent or otherwise inappropriate. Also, some websites ask visitors to enter personal information. Parents should not allow their children to enter personal information without first finding and reviewing the site’s privacy policy, which websites are required to provide to visitors, if they ask for personal information. Here are some basic Internet guidelines for you and your child: Continue reading

Research sheds new light on autism

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

Based on statistics, you probably know someone with a form of autism. Autism rates in America grew by 30 percent from 2008-2010 and have doubled since 2000. Now, one in 68 8-year-olds are diagnosed with autism. On average, one child in each grade of every elementary school has autism. What is responsible for the remarkable rise of this disease?

Perhaps we have gotten better at diagnosing it. Now, researchers are working to establish how autism occurs, even before birth, and how to diagnose it sooner.Autism is actually not a single disease but a spectrum of disorders. It is clearly related to infant development and is caused by differences in the brain. There are multiple causes of autism, but most are not yet known. One possible connection is that people tend to conceive later. The age at which women give birth has been increasing for many years and is linked to higher chances of autism.

Diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders relies on observing differences in a person’s communication, social skills and typical behavior. Roughly one-third of those with autism are also diagnosed with intellectual deficits, but the remaining two-thirds have normal or above average intelligence. Most are diagnosed at 4 years old but some are identified by age 2. This is critical because research has repeatedly shown that the earlier therapy starts, the more likely it will result in substantial improvement. Continue reading

Recommendations about dealing with children’s head injuries

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

What should you do if your child has a head injury but does not lose consciousness? This is what is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

For anything more than a light bump on the head, you should call your child’s doctor. The doctor will want to know when and how the injury happened and how your child is feeling.If your child is alert and responds to you, the head injury is mild and usually no tests or X-rays are needed.Your child may cry from pain or fright but this should last no longer than 10 minutes. You may need to apply a cold compress for 20 minutes to help the swelling go down and then watch your child closely for a time.

If there are any changes in your child’s condition call your doctor right away.You may need to bring your child to the doctor’s office or to the hospital.The following are signs of a more serious injury: Continue reading

How clean is too clean?

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

Common knowledge and previous studies generally agree that children who grow up in the inner city and are exposed to mouse allergens, roach allergens and air pollutants are more likely to develop asthma and allergies. But a recent study adds a new twist — children exposed to these substances in their first year of life actually had lower rates of asthma and allergies. However, if these allergens were first encountered after age one, this protective effect did not exist.

Another study parallels this one, concluding that children growing up on farms also have lower allergy and asthma rates. Scientists argue that farm children are regularly exposed to microbes and allergens at an early age, leading to this same protective effect.

Asthma is the most common chronic condition among children. One in five Americans, or 60 million people, has asthma and allergies. In the industrialized world, allergic diseases have been on the rise for more than 50 years. Worldwide, 40-50 percent of school-age children are sensitive to one or more common allergens. Continue reading

Tips to help children have a fun and safe Halloween

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

It’s almost Halloween again. Before sending your little ones out in search of candy, consider the following to ensure that he or she has a trick-free Halloween:

  • Don’t buy a costume unless it’s labeled “flame-retardant.”
  • Make sure that wigs and “beards” don’t cover your child’s eyes, nose or mouths.
  • Encourage your child to choose a costume without a mask. Masks can make it difficult for your child to breathe. Use face paint instead.
  • Suggest a light-colored costume for your child, or add glow-in-the dark tape on the front and back of a dark costume.
  • Avoid oversized or high-heeled shoes that can cause your child to trip and fall.
  • Make sure that accessories, such as swords or wands are flexible.
  • Put a name tag with your phone number on or inside your child’s costume.

If your child will be trick or treating: Continue reading

Smoke alarms dramatically raise fire survival rate

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

October is fire prevention month. According to the National Fire Protection Association, a home structure fire was reported every 87 seconds in 2009.

When a fire starts in a wooden home, the inhabitants often have no more than minutes to escape. Confusion about what to do wastes those valuable minutes. Early warning given by smoke alarms is very important. Fire alarms dramatically increase the survival rate of all of the family. Two-thirds of home fires that kill children 5 and younger occur in homes without a working smoke alarm.

Make sure you change your battery when daylight saving time changes late Saturday night or early Sunday morning.

Parents should install an alarm on each level of the home and outside bedrooms or other sleeping areas. Remember to test alarms monthly and change batteries at least once a year — preferably twice, at biannual time changes. If an infant sleeps in a separate room, place an alarm in the room. Keep the door closed to protect against the smoke of a hallway fire. Use a baby monitor to hear it if the alarm sounds. Continue reading