Prevent birth defects with a healthy diet

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Pregnancy is a time in which nutrition is very important for the health of both mother and baby.

Women who are pregnant are encouraged to eat healthy diets with a variety of food groups. A recent study in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that mothers who ate higher quality diets had fewer babies with spina bifida and cleft lip or palate.

This study shows the importance of eating a varied high quality diet. Pregnancy is also a time in which certain vitamins are particularly important to promote a baby’s growth and development.

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Breast is best when it comes to early childhood nutrition

Dr. Victor Sierpina

Dr. Victor Sierpina

You just had a healthy baby. Congratulations! In these days when many women struggle with infertility and challenges getting pregnant, a baby is a truly wonderful gift, as it always has been.

By the way, check out Dr. Steve Pratt’s latest book “SuperFoods Rx for Pregnancy” to prepare for and have a healthy pregnancy and baby.

Now that labor is done, the work really begins.

By now, you and everyone else likely know about the benefits of breast-feeding.

The human breast, like that of all mammals, was perfectly designed to create optimal nutrition for the vulnerable newborn.

Breast milk has everything in it needed for a new baby to grow and thrive. This includes calories derived from healthy fats and essential proteins, minerals and vitamins needed to grow a healthy brain, body and immune system in your baby. Continue reading

Properly store pumped breast milk to protect infants

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Breast-feeding offers infants the healthiest nutritional start. Sometimes in today’s busy life, mothers have to spend time away from their infants, so pumping and storing breast milk becomes necessary.

Mothers pumping — or expressing — milk for an infant have a number of choices for storing and preserving it.

The guidelines that follow are based upon information supplied by Anne Merewood, director of lactation services at the Breastfeeding Center of Boston Medical Center, and were published in Contemporary Pediatrics.

The guidelines concern only healthy babies. If your infant has special problems, consult your pediatrician. Continue reading

Proactive education can help reduce teen pregnancies

Drs. Tristi Muir and Catherine Hansen

Drs. Tristi Muir and Catherine Hansen

Our Bodies, Our Lives 

Our Bodies, Our Lives focuses on issues surrounding women’s sexual, gynecological and emotional health.

Unintended teenage pregnancy is still a significant problem in the United States. When an unwed teen becomes pregnant, her future options can become very limited. If she has not yet completed school, gained employment skills or even had much opportunity to experience adult life, she is likely to face some challenges.

In 2010, approximately 368,000 U.S. teenagers 15-19 gave birth. Sixty percent of sexually experienced teens reported using a highly effective birth control like an IUD or hormonal method.

Given that so many teenage girls with unintended pregnancies were not using contraception when they became pregnant, it seems that proactive sexual health education might be a good way to reduce this burden. Even if abstinence is the program of choice, we feel that we are obliged to protect the younger generation by equipping them with information and education about their sexual health. Continue reading

Our Bodies, Our Lives – Pregnancy brain: Is it fact or fiction?

Drs. Tristi Muir and Catherine Hansen

Drs. Tristi Muir and Catherine Hansen

Our Bodies, Our Lives

I know I opened my calendar to add something to it … but what was it?” An exhausted and exasperated Julia, who is 7 months pregnant, finds that words escape her, and on occasion, she heads into a room only to forget what she is looking for. Is this “pregnancy brain” — also called momnesia or pregnesia?

Women, and men, often joke about the memory lapses caused by pregnancy. But is it true? What are the changes that take place? Are the changes all bad?

First of all, we can assure you that there are some very real changes that occur in the brain during pregnancy. Hormone levels of estrogen and progesterone (hormones produced by a woman’s ovaries) increase 30 to 70 fold. The brain is responsive to hormonal changes. But do these hormones alter cognition? Continue reading