Legal for medical research: Marijuana is beneficial for cancer patients

Dr. Victor Sierpina

Dr. Victor Sierpina

Rocky Mountain high. Imagine my surprise when I returned to visit the tiny mountain hamlet in Colorado where I was in solo practice as the country doc for nearly a decade back in the 1980s and ’90s and discovered a new clinic on main street.

The town is in a mountain valley situated at 7,500 feet above sea level. So, the new clinic was appropriately and whimsically called The High Valley Cannabis Center.

Medical marijuana had come to a town long known for its aging hippies and artists who were no strangers to its usage. Many not only inhaled weed in the ’60s, but I suspect a number had never exhaled.

As more states, now numbering around 15, approve marijuana as legal for medical, or even recreational, use, as recently occurred in Colorado, we come inevitably to the question of is this a good idea for sick people or is it a social folly? Continue reading

Be on look out for swimmer’s ear in children

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Swimming is a great way for kids to stay active, especially during the summer months.

However, the combination of heat, humidity and water can lead to an ear condition called acute otitis external, more commonly known as swimmer’s ear. The infection often is caused by bacteria being carried into the outer ear canal.
Symptoms of swimmer’s ear include redness, swelling, itching, drainage of pus and pain.

Following are some tips from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent and treat swimmer’s ear: Continue reading

Hope for those with rheumatoid arthritis

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

For the 1.5 million people in the United States who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, there may be new hope. Scientists have discovered an inflammatory stress response that drives the development of RA and a specific inhibitor that could be used to block it.

While the immune system normally protects us from infections, autoimmune disorders like RA cause the immune system to attack its own body. RA produces chronic inflammation that can damage many organs, especially flexible joints. It mostly affects women between the ages of 40 and 60, although it can develop at any age. There appears to be a genetic component as well as an environmental trigger that contributes to RA. Continue reading

A few tips for handling that rash down under

Dr. Tristi Muir

Dr. Tristi Muir

Our Bodies, Our Lives

Like it or not, it’s swimsuit season. You hit the gym and work out to look good in revealing summer wear — causing sweating and rubbing of the vulva and inner thighs (“chub rub”).

When you dive into the summer itself, you find yourself lounging in a wet swimsuit bottom. This constant moisture provides a perfect environment for bacteria and yeast to proliferate.

Breaks in the skin due to rubbing, itching or shaving can lead to a secondary infection that can cause enough redness, itchiness and pain to ruin a beautiful summer day.

Unfortunately, many women suffer in silence — they are embarrassed to see a doctor — and search for an Internet cure.

Let’s explore what could be going on down under. Continue reading

How to take the sting out of bee, wasp stings

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

Summer is here and yellow jackets compete for our barbecued burgers and soft drinks while bumblebees in the clover can collide with big and little bare feet.

As many parents know, bee stings can put a damper on summer fun. Here are a few things to keep in mind if your little one gets stung.

Most bee stings cause a painful red bump, which often appears immediately.

If you notice a black dot in the bump, the stinger may still be in the skin and needs to be removed.

You can do this by simply scraping across the black spot with a striate edge, such as a plastic credit card or fingernail. Continue reading

Multiple factors drove the genetic mutation for lactase production

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

Drinking milk might seem perfectly natural, but it’s actually anything but.

Humans are the only species who retain the ability to digest milk after childhood, or at least some of us do.

Up to half of adults worldwide don’t have the ability to break down lactose, the main sugar in milk, because their bodies stop producing the enzyme lactase after the age of 5.

About 65 to 75 percent of the population has some degree of lactose intolerance, the most common cause for digestive issues with dairy.

Lactase breaks down lactose into simpler forms of sugar that can be absorbed by the bloodstream. Without this enzyme, lactose is fermented by bacteria, causing symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, nausea and diarrhea 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating. Continue reading

Hit the pause button

Dr. Victor Sierpina

Dr. Victor Sierpina

We, as a conscious species, tend to look at external events as determining the course of our lives.

Likely this was true in our prehistoric ancestors’ era when failure to respond to a hungry saber-tooth tiger would be a matter of not merely uncomfortable stress but rather the discomfort of getting chewed to death or at least bleeding rather heavily.

In our day, external threats, though they still exist in the battlefield and certain neighborhoods, are generally less pressing.

More common for most of us are internal threats, our own thinking, and how we choose to respond to the world around us.

Let me illustrate what I am talking about. At a recent talk I attended by Mary Mannin Morrissey, a well-known spiritual teacher and author, she gave an example of something she learned at age 22 that might be helpful to you.

One Sunday, she went to a church service where the speaker suggested a way to reverse the reflexive habit of an external action causing an immediate reaction. Continue reading

Mentally ill may be easy to blame, but they’re rarely violent

Dr. Jeff Temple

Dr. Jeff Temple

Here we are on the heels of several mass shootings. What used to be shocking has become commonplace. In fact, the United States is averaging more than one per month for the last five years.

These events have the public, media, talking heads and politicians searching for explanations and an answer to stop the bloodshed.

Increasingly, mental illness has become the convenient culprit. But let’s not mistake correlation for causation.

Mental illness does not cause violence. If it did, then homicide rates in other developed countries would be on par with that of the United States. They are not.

In 2012, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime found that Americans are 4.5 times more likely to die by homicide than citizens of other developed countries.

And while more than 25 percent of Americans will have a diagnosable mental disorder, nearly all of them will not hurt or threaten to hurt anyone. And nearly all them find the actions of Adam Lanza, Elliot Rodger and Aaron Ybarra reprehensible. Continue reading

Goodbye to annual Pap smear

Dr. Tristi Muir

Dr. Tristi Muir

Our Bodies, Our Lives

The musical “Evita” depicts the true story of Eva Perón, who rose from an illegitimate birth to become the passionate “spiritual leader of Argentina.”

During her lifetime, she promoted labor rights, championed women’s right to vote in Argentina, established a foundation to help the poor and won the hearts of a nation.

As Eva was riding this wave of political momentum, she was diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer and died at the young age of 33.

Can you imagine how much more she could have accomplished if Pap smears were available? Unfortunately, the tests were just being introduced in the United States at the time of her death in the early ’50s.

Cervical cancer once was the No. 1 cancer in women. After the introduction of Pap smears, cervical cancer rates in women in the United States fell to No. 14.

Even today, screening is not available in many developing countries, and in those countries, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in women. Continue reading

Lawn mower-related injuries can be prevented

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Drs. Sally Robinson & Keith Bly

Keeping Kids Healthy

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, in 2010, 17,000 youths 19 and younger were treated for lawn mower-related injuries.

Many of these injuries occur in older children and teens. Boys with the average age of 11 make up 75 percent of the children injured. However, small children also are at risk of injury.

Lawn mowers have the potential to cause serious injuries. The blades are sharp enough to slice and even amputate limbs, and objects that get caught in the blades fly out with great force.

Though doing yard work together may be a fun family activity, children should not be around when you are mowing.

Some tips to prevent lawn mower-related injuries include: Continue reading