The bad news is time flies. The good news is you’re the pilot.

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemWhen I was in grade school, time seemed to stand still. The school year seemed to last forever, and it felt like summer would never arrive. The days before Christmas (which my family celebrates) were the longest days imaginable. The hands on the clock seemed to stand still as I waited for my cousin and best friend to come over to play.

I have a vivid memory as a twelve-year-old. I was sitting on the steps of our front porch and thinking about my grandparents, who had recently come to visit. I was worried about getting old like they were—I didn’t want to grow old! However, when I did the math, I realized that they were 62, and I remember promptly feeling much, much better because that was such a long way off!

Now, fast forward to this past December. All of my children and their families were visiting for the holidays. Both of my twin sons and their wives had become parents that year, and they were enjoying introducing their daughter and son to all the members of our family. I remember one evening as we all sat around the living room, one of my sons commented on how quickly time had seemed to pass, “It seems like it was just last week that we were all together for the winter holidays.” I smiled as I wondered how he grew up so fast and was now married with a daughter.

These days, time seems to fly!

It is almost unbelievable to me that this is the last Friday Flash Report of fiscal year 2015, and next week we will publish the last Friday Focus Newsletter of the year. Many of the plans we made when we started this year are now complete. The FY2016 budget is behind us, as are all of the performance evaluations. The 84th legislative session came to a close in June, and we made some additional strides in service to patients through the Correctional Managed Care program. We have also worked hard to integrate the Angleton Danbury Campus into UTMB, and implemented UTMB’s electronic medical record (Epic) throughout the site.

We have made tremendous progress this year! Each day, I’m amazed by the view from my office, as I see the beautiful new Jennie Sealy Hospital nearing completion. I look forward to celebrating its opening next spring. I continue to marvel at UTMB’s growth off the island. From the League City Campus to the Angleton Danbury Campus, to the openings of the Primary and Specialty Care Clinics in Texas City and Alvin, and the new Pediatric Urgent and Primary Care Clinic in Galveston, it has been a year of progress and growth, and these exceptional facilities will help us better serve our patients and train future physicians, nurses and health professionals.

Although the past year was challenging at times, it is anticipated that the Health System will meet its budget on the close of business August 31, 2015. And in addition to all of this, we have achieved many new certifications that speak to the talent, skill and teamwork involved in making sure that our patients receive the very best of care. To all of you who have worked so hard to help UTMB achieve this growth and success, thank you!

We have a lot to look forward to in the upcoming fiscal year. Thinking about all that we aspire to achieve, we realize there will be more hard work ahead of us, and we will surely be met with a few new challenges, as well. But I am certain we will rise to the occasion and succeed by remaining focused on the initiatives that will move our organization forward.

In the coming fiscal year, our focus in the Health System will be to:

  • Make a quantum leap in our quality and safety performance. We already have many strategies in place to address and improve our performance in the quality measurements of value-based purchasing, including patient satisfaction, 30-day readmissions, healthcare-associated infections and hospital-acquired conditions, as well as hand hygiene. While we have seen some improvements in the past year, all other organizations to which we compare ourselves have also improved, and some have improved more quickly than we have. We must achieve greater improvements in quality and safety!
  • Continue investments in our people. We will refer to the results of the upcoming You Count! Pulse Survey to continue to identify and act on improvements you recommend. I am not sure if you know it or not, but Friday Flash Reports began as a result of feedback from Health System employees who asked to hear more from me about where we were headed and how each individual in our organization plays an important role in our future. Many of the new offerings for training in Human Resources have also been resulted from survey feedback.
  • Achieve a $49M improvement in net patient care margin. We have developed action plans which address the needed improvements, and we will need to utilize all of our resources effectively in order to meet this goal.
  • Become more transparent. You will soon be seeing UTMB’s quality information reported publicly on our website. The data will be front and center for our patients and community to easily access. Some of the information will be specific—for example, patient satisfaction responses will be presented at the provider level. Some organizations are already doing this, and we believe it is critical that we share how we are performing in these areas with our community and our patients in a timely and accurate manner.

The future will be here before we know it. If we maintain a laser-like focus on these four areas—the continued investments in our people, quantum leaps in quality and safety, transparency with our outcomes, and using our resources as wisely as possible—the future will be filled with promise.

I always look for inspiration, whether it’s in something I’m reading, a story about one of our employees, or a conversation I have along the way. In his commencement address to the 2005 graduating class at Stanford, Steve Jobs asked the audience if they could remember the last time they had asked themselves why they were doing something, or why it mattered to them. He said, “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

We are all in health care because we believe in what we do. I love what I do. Although I do not deliver direct patient care, I make an impact and that matters to me. Through my work, I am helping make a difference in people’s lives. I’m able to support those who do work on the front lines of health care. And I believe in delivering excellent patient care. I believe in keeping our patients and families safe and at the heart of everything we do. I believe in offering the very best facilities and services for our employees and those we serve. And I believe that if we remain dedicated and focused, we will be successful in all our endeavors this year.

Happy New Fiscal Year, and thank you each for all you do to make UTMB a great place to receive care and a great place to work!

The bad news is time flies. The good news is you're the pilot.

 

 

 

Inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemThe other day, my husband and I were talking about what I had learned during my 40-year career in health care. During the conversation, he asked me what I thought had been the best compliment I had ever received over the years. This was a really tough question, because I have worked with so many people who have generously shared their positive thoughts with me. As I thought about this, the story of an associate with whom I had worked early in my career came to mind. She had been one of the managers at the same small medical school in Central Illinois I mentioned last week. I’ll call her Susan.

Susan and I had worked together for nearly ten years, and it was a pleasure working with her. She was older than I, but she didn’t have a lot of experience working with faculty, so there were times when her decisions were not as inclusive as they could have been, or she had made decisions without gathering sufficient input. As I worked with her over the years, I provided feedback to help her improve in those interactions and to fully develop the potential I knew she had. I always appreciated that she listened attentively and made appropriate adjustments in her management style.

Years later at my going away party, I remember talking with Susan. She had been asked to take my position! Although I cannot recall everything she said that evening, I do remember that she said she would miss me, and I had been the only person she’d ever worked with who was willing to take the time to talk to her and give her guidance on ways she could improve. Even though I was giving her corrections, she said she still left the conversations feeling good about her performance and about herself. Without a doubt, that may be one of the best compliments I have received in my career.

I have always found giving constructive feedback to others about their performance to be very difficult. But when I think of Susan, I remember that it not only helped the team succeed, it also helped Susan achieve personal success. I think most people would agree that such conversations can be challenging. As a result, people handle it differently. Some would rather ignore problems to avoid conflict, even if it means the problem will grow. On the other hand, there are individuals who have very little difficulty pointing out what someone did incorrectly, yet they often deliver the message in a way that leaves the person on the receiving end feeling discouraged.

Whether you are a manager or a colleague, delivering your message in just the right way takes thought, skill and practice. I always try to keep in mind that most people come to work because they want to make a difference. So, I like to balance positive feedback with constructive feedback. I try to begin with something positive and complimentary, focusing on what the person is doing well. Then, I give feedback on what they can do to improve. The latter may not mean they are doing something wrong. It may simply be that there are suggestions for ways they can achieve their full potential.

I like to think of providing feedback like coaching. Coaches give feedback in real time, rather than letting things pile up. Regular feedback allows people to focus on one or two areas for improvement, rather than feeling bombarded. At the end of each practice session, the team huddles. After carefully listening to the team, it’s time for the coach to offer some helpful advice. It isn’t the time for negative criticism; rather, constructive criticism is what people need. These conversations should always happen in person (never send constructive feedback via email). This gives both parties—the coach and the team—an opportunity to talk about things in context and share their perspectives. Giving feedback is a conversation!

Suggestions should be complete so people know what they should do, and they should feel encouraged. The best feedback leaves people feeling empowered. It’s also helpful to ask questions, which gives the person receiving feedback a chance to reflect on what they might do differently. I’ve found that most of the time, people feel more motivated to make changes when they’ve realized something on their own. This does not always work, but it is a great place to start.

Meanwhile, asking questions is also an opportunity to discover what I can do to help the person improve. Am I providing clear enough direction? Am I allowing the person to have development opportunities? Am I sufficiently available for discussions? Do I listen well enough? Sometimes, in the course of the conversation, we find ways we can improve, too!

I would be remiss if I didn’t admit that it can sometimes be difficult to receive constructive feedback. However, as recipients, we need to be willing to focus on what is being said and not take it personally. We need to want to improve and to do that, we have to be willing to listen to and consider what others are saying to us. Constructive criticism is a two-way street. For the best results, you need to not only be a skilled coach but also someone who is coachable. In order to effectively communicate, you must be good a listener.

Above all, I believe it is important to remember that people want to feel appreciated for their effort, especially when they were proactive or showed initiative to take on a project or task. Without a sense of appreciation, a motivated employee or colleague may take a step back in the future, finding it safer to stay silent, or preferring to wait to be told what to do instead of taking a hands-on approach.

Tom Peters is an American writer on business management practices, who asserts that leadership is about nurturing and enhancing. Leaders who lift people up get farther than those who push down. Do everything you can to support your employees and colleagues, whether it’s resources, knowledge, information, or thoughtful and constructive advice.

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If you aren’t in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?

Donna Sollenberger, EVP & CEO, UTMB Health SystemEarly in my career, I worked as the administrator in the department of surgery of a small medical school in Central Illinois. It was a wonderful setting to begin my administrative career, because I had the chance to experience many opportunities I wouldn’t have otherwise been given at a much larger medical school.

One of those experiences surfaced around the advent of the personal computer. Our chair of surgery decided he wanted to replace the institutional mainframe with a local area network (LAN) for the whole department. And that would not have been a problem, except for the fact that he wanted the department to manage it, not the chief information officer (CIO) for the school.

The chair assigned one of our researchers, an individual with a great aptitude for computers, to negotiate this change with the CIO. After three months of meetings, however, neither side wanted to budge on who “owned” the network.

At that point, the chair told me that he wanted me to “broker” this deal and get the CIO to concede the management of the network to the department. Because he was my boss, I agreed, but I have to tell you I was reluctant—I knew very little about computers and even less about personal computers and local area networks! The only thing that boosted my confidence was that I generally could get people to come together and reach an agreement, even when they had not been able to before.

At the first meeting, I let the researcher and the CIO do most of the talking. I asked them to tell me, from their perspective, how each envisioned the system would be configured and implemented, and what each thought the barriers were to reaching an agreement. As the talking continued, I remember thinking that the meeting might as well have been in a foreign language, because I was not fluent in half the terminology they used once they got into specifics. I left the meeting wondering what I could ever do to move this discussion along, and I was a little concerned about whether I could actually get these two gentlemen to agree.

Rather than accept defeat, I began reading everything I could about LANs and their configuration, the future of the mainframe in a world evolving to use personal computers, and how others had managed similar implementations. I knew that in order to accomplish the job I’d been assigned, I had to educate myself. Although I was daunted by the learning curve, I was also energized by the possibility of learning about something which was definitely going to change how we worked.

When the project ended two months later, I had successfully brought the researcher and CIO to an agreement. Today, the details of that agreement have faded from memory, but what I do remember is that the CIO agreed to support us in putting the LAN in the department as a pilot for the rest of the medical school, the researcher could define the configuration, and the system would be maintained by the CIO and his team. Meanwhile, I had become the “go to” person in administration for other departments as they each began to implement their own networks.

Albert Einstein once said, “The only source of knowledge is experience.” I had used an opportunity to increase my value to the organization and better prepare myself for a changing future. And, I had helped the departments involved maintain a positive relationship.

I believe that with the right attitude, we can completely reframe the way we experience challenges—we can take advantage of challenging situations to unlock our untapped strengths and abilities. Each time we do this, it will increase our confidence until we begin to see most challenges as opportunities to harness our personal power to an even greater degree.

I am reminded about this story each time we take on something new. We have a choice: we can either resist change or even try to keep the inevitable from happening; or, we can personally take the necessary steps and contribute to making the change a success. If you refuse to let challenges intimidate you or slow you down, you just might inspire and motivate others to do the same when they face obstacles of their own. Anytime you experience personal growth, you help the people around you in some way!

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