How to Prepare Your Child for Shots

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As a pediatrician I looked forward to getting my children vaccinated, knowing that they would at last be protected against deadly diseases.  As a parent, I await those days with a bit of dread.  No one likes seeing their kids cry, even for a really healthy and good reason.  Sometimes it is tough to know how best to prepare for those moments.  Here are a few tips to get you and your kids through the anxiety of getting shots.

 

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Vitamin D3, Deficiency, What We Know, and Recommendations

poole-joseph004Vitamin D is an important nutrient that should be evaluated and maintained in each adult patient. Because Vitamin D is synthesized in the skin, it is technically a hormone, and because hormone deficiencies disrupt homeostasis, overlooking this vitamin can have unintended consequences including prostate and colorectal cancer, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes (Bender, 2017). The protective benefits of a normal Vitamin D also include respiratory protection and all-cause mortality benefits (Wimalawansa, 2016).

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Anxiety

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Miguel Nunez, MD

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Joseph Poole, FNP


Anxiety is defined as “fear or nervousness about what might happen” (Merrium-Webster, 2016). The condition of anxiety can include fear, nervousness, jitters and even panic. Anxiety is so prevalent, it is said that 25% of all adults will experience it one time in their lives, making it more common than depression (Satterfield, Feldman, 2014). The types of anxiety seen in clinic are exhibited in the following table:
Anxiety Disorder Prevalence in Primary Care (%)

  • Acute stress disorder 3–5
  • Agoraphobia 1–3
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder 4–9
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 1–2
  • Panic Disorder 1–6
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder 2–12
  • Social phobia 3–7
  • Specific phobia 8–13
  • Adjustment disorder with anxiety 4.5–9.2
  • Anxiety disorder due to a general medical condition 14–66
  • Substance-induced anxiety disorder Unknown prevalence
  • Anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) Unknown (Table 1 Satterfield, Feldman, 2014).

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Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), the Silent Killer

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Miguel Nunez, MD

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Joseph Poole, FNP


Many people in our community have an easily manageable health problem that can quickly be identified, treated and resolved to prevent future health issues and mortality.

Risks of Hypertension
The most widely known events from having high blood pressure are often known and include heart attack and stroke. While these 2 outcomes are the worst end result from high blood pressure, other less known issues can occur: These include heart enlargement (which can lead to heart failure) and kidney disease (which can result in a patient needing dialysis from kidney failure). Eye damage (retinopathy) and artery damage (peripheral artery disease) can also occur.

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5210

Haverty, Amy015210-Ever hear those numbers? No, it’s not your middle school student’s locker combination, or one of an endless list of passwords.

Do you wish you could help your family eat healthier but feel overwhelmed by all the advice and information out there? Each seemingly contradicts the other.  Do you worry about your children’s health, but are too busy with taking care of them, school, activities, work, etc., to be able to figure out and commit to the best way to make some changes? If so, there is a very easy way to help.  It’s called 5210.

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Colonoscopy Facts

What is colonoscopy? Do I have to get one? How often? Why do I need one? What is the goal of that test?

These are questions that one asks as they visit their physician for their annual exam. A colonoscopy is a test that where the physician looks with a magnifying camera at the inner lining of a person’s large intestine. Sample biopsies may be done at the time of the test. The colonoscopy test is typically performed for colon and rectal cancer screening, but the physician may order it for other reasons as well, which include: blood in the stool, abnormal test results from another colon test, family history of colon cancer, anemia unexplained otherwise. The stated are some indications for colonoscopy, but it is not an inclusive list.

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August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Selwyn Rogers, Chief Medical OfficerIt was a typical Tuesday in my former job as chair of surgery at Temple University in Philadelphia, but that morning I felt sluggish. Although I wasn’t feeling well, I knew I had three surgical operations to perform that morning followed by an afternoon full of meetings.

I trudged out of my apartment and started the 15-minute drive to work.

A few miles into my commute, a feeling of illness suddenly enveloped me. I had to pull over and call my chief resident to cancel the morning’s surgeries.

I turned the car around and headed back home to bed. The next three days were a blur of sore throat and fever; it was the first time I’d had the flu, and I swore that I would never endure that experience again.
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How to decrease added sugar in your child’s diet

Dr. Lauren Raimer-GoodmanSugar is sneaky.  There are plenty of foods out there that we think of as healthy that have added sugar.  Unfortunately we don’t know exactly how much added sugar there is, as companies are not required to make a distinction between natural and processed or added sugars on nutrition labels. They also don’t have to tell you what percent of the recommended daily value of added sugar their product contains.  (fortunately the FDA has proprosed changing this – if the proposed changes can make it through the legislative process).

There is a lot in the news these days about the negative health effects of added sugar.  Notably, increased sugar intake adds to the risk of heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and many other health issues we would rather our children not have to experience. Continue reading

Planting trees whose fruit we will never eat

Dr. Victor Sierpina

Dr. Victor Sierpina

The week before last, I made a house call to Robert, a patient on hospice. He was listless, semi-comatose, with pinpoint pupils from the morphine, and yellow as a gourd from cancer-related liver failure. His devoted wife, along with friends, family, and the hospice care team were keeping him as comfortable as possible as he transitioned from life after a decadelong courageous battle with colon cancer.

Even after spending some time with him talking, examining, reading, praying, I wasn’t quite sure he could hear or understand me. At that point, I started to feel like I had done what I could for him. Now I was there for his family.

This was a special man who had fought his hardest, had created a cancer survivor support group, and who was dying at a prematurely young age. He kept going to his work as a scientist at a local university up until about 2 weeks before his death. Yes, he could only last a few hours at the lab, but his study of sargassum seaweed was his passion and gave his life meaning and purpose until the end. He also played a huge role in the education of the students he mentored. Like his love of planting fruit-bearing trees, he planted seeds of scholarly inquiry, motivated them, and challenged them to achieve more. Continue reading

The Myopia pandemic

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

You’ve probably heard of pandemics — the plague, influenza, HIV — but you might not have seen coverage of the growing myopia pandemic. Before you consider bathing in sanitizer, you should know that myopia isn’t contagious. Another word for it is nearsightedness.

Myopia is a condition in which close objects are seen clearly but distant objects are blurred due to the elongation of the eye or too much curvature of the cornea. This causes light entering the eye to focus in front of the retina rather than on it. Myopia is different from hyperopia, which is the kind of nearsightedness that comes from growing older. In fact, the myopia pandemic is primarily affecting young people.

It currently affects 90 percent of the young adults in China, although 60 years ago it was 10-20 percent. In the United States and Europe it affects about half of all young adults, double what it was 50 years ago. Seoul has the highest incidence: 96.5 percent of young people in South Korea’s capital have myopia. An estimated 2.5 billion people will experience myopia by 2020. Continue reading