How to Prepare Your Child for Shots

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As a pediatrician I looked forward to getting my children vaccinated, knowing that they would at last be protected against deadly diseases.  As a parent, I await those days with a bit of dread.  No one likes seeing their kids cry, even for a really healthy and good reason.  Sometimes it is tough to know how best to prepare for those moments.  Here are a few tips to get you and your kids through the anxiety of getting shots.

 

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Vitamin D3, Deficiency, What We Know, and Recommendations

poole-joseph004Vitamin D is an important nutrient that should be evaluated and maintained in each adult patient. Because Vitamin D is synthesized in the skin, it is technically a hormone, and because hormone deficiencies disrupt homeostasis, overlooking this vitamin can have unintended consequences including prostate and colorectal cancer, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes (Bender, 2017). The protective benefits of a normal Vitamin D also include respiratory protection and all-cause mortality benefits (Wimalawansa, 2016).

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The Power of Reading to Your Child

smith-adri03Reading aloud to your child is an important part of family time that promotes parent-child bonding, brings balance to hectic family life and prepares your child for a lifetime of learning.  Most experts recommend reading to your children daily, even to infants.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends reading at least a few minutes per day starting at birth.

So why the focus on early reading?  Most studies show several benefits to regular reading in children including improved bonding with parents, better performance in all aspects of education (even math!), improvement in basic speech and communication skills, better logical thinking and better concentration.

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Anxiety

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Miguel Nunez, MD

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Joseph Poole, FNP


Anxiety is defined as “fear or nervousness about what might happen” (Merrium-Webster, 2016). The condition of anxiety can include fear, nervousness, jitters and even panic. Anxiety is so prevalent, it is said that 25% of all adults will experience it one time in their lives, making it more common than depression (Satterfield, Feldman, 2014). The types of anxiety seen in clinic are exhibited in the following table:
Anxiety Disorder Prevalence in Primary Care (%)

  • Acute stress disorder 3–5
  • Agoraphobia 1–3
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder 4–9
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 1–2
  • Panic Disorder 1–6
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder 2–12
  • Social phobia 3–7
  • Specific phobia 8–13
  • Adjustment disorder with anxiety 4.5–9.2
  • Anxiety disorder due to a general medical condition 14–66
  • Substance-induced anxiety disorder Unknown prevalence
  • Anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) Unknown (Table 1 Satterfield, Feldman, 2014).

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Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), the Silent Killer

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Miguel Nunez, MD

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Joseph Poole, FNP


Many people in our community have an easily manageable health problem that can quickly be identified, treated and resolved to prevent future health issues and mortality.

Risks of Hypertension
The most widely known events from having high blood pressure are often known and include heart attack and stroke. While these 2 outcomes are the worst end result from high blood pressure, other less known issues can occur: These include heart enlargement (which can lead to heart failure) and kidney disease (which can result in a patient needing dialysis from kidney failure). Eye damage (retinopathy) and artery damage (peripheral artery disease) can also occur.

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The Tomb of an Egyptian Doctor

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Drs. Norbert Herzog & David Niesel

Medical Discovery News

It’s not every day that archeologists uncover the tomb of an Egyptian pharaoh. But on one special day they discovered not the tomb of a pharaoh but the physician to them. Abusir, the great royal cemetery south of Cairo, is the final resting place of Shepseskaf-Ankh, head physician of Upper and Lower Egypt during the Fifth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom.

This tomb was dated to about 2400 B.C. By this time, the famous pyramids of Giza had already been constructed, so rulers of the Fifth Dynasty built pyramids farther south between 2465 and 2325 B.C. This is the third tomb of a physician discovered so far. They were entombed along with other court officials and high-level priests close to the rulers they served in life, and would continue to do so in death, according to Egyptian beliefs of the afterlife.

Shepseskaf-Ankh was from an elite Egyptian family and also held the title of priest, which was carved on the door of the tomb. It is a relatively large tomb, another indicator of his importance, with an open court and eight burial chambers for him and his family. Continue reading

Do We Smell the Same Thing?

Medical Discovery News

Have you ever wondered if we all sense the world in the same way? Evidence suggests that the sense of smell is highly individualized, based on genetic differences. This could revolutionize scents and food flavors into custom-designed creations for individuals.

Humans have specialized neuronal cells within the lining the nasal cavities, part of what’s called the olfactory epithelium. The surface of these cells, like much of the nasal cavity, is covered with mucus. Odor molecules dissolve into this layer and are detected when they bind to receptors on the neurons. This sets off a string of biochemical events that produces a signal, which travels along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb of the brain. Then that signal is transferred to different regions of the brain’s cerebrum. Here odors can be distinguished and characterized. These signals are stored in long-term memory, which is linked to emotional memory. That’s why particular smells can evoke memories. This process is quite complex due to the highly evolved sense of smell in humans. Continue reading